New Hampshire voters are speaking out about the presidential primaries — about Biden, Trump and more

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New Hampshire voters head to the polls Tuesday to cast ballots in a presidential primary that could significantly impact the race for the Republican nomination.

It’s largely between former President Donald Trump, the favorite in polls to win both the New Hampshire and general primaries, and former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, the last remaining major candidate running against him.

Some still don’t know who to support in the days leading up to the race.

“I’ve changed my mind about a dozen times now,” Mark Lacroix said.

However, others described their candidate as someone who could cure the country’s ills, with many voters expressing bleak perceptions of the economy and cost of living — a recurring theme dating back to at least the 2022 midterm elections.

“When you talk to the average working-class voter, their debt is increasing, everything is more expensive for them, and that’s what they feel,” Bobby O’Donnell said.

“I’m going to vote for Nikki Haley because she’s fresh, she’s young, she’s an accountant, and I love that. She’s going to balance the budget,” Maureen Ennis told ABC News.

However, most voters expressed confidence that Trump would run away with the state.

“I think President Trump is going to win. I think after New Hampshire, I think if he wins this state, Nikki Haley has to win it to survive,” Cooper Walsh said.

“I support President Trump because he has a proven track record of getting things done. I think Americans are tired of what Joe Biden has done to this country. I think they want to close the border. … They want to see the economy boom again.” “I personally want a president who supports women in women’s sports,” Maya Harvey said, adding that Trump would “absolutely” be the Republican nominee.

Photo: Republican presidential candidate and former United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley is joined by New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu as they visit a polling site at Winnaconnet High School to greet voters on January 23, 2024, in Hampton, New Hampshire.

Republican presidential candidate and former United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley is joined by New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu as they visit a polling site at Winnaconnet High School to greet voters on January 23, 2024, in Hampton, New Hampshire.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Some voters were eager to vote because they feared this prediction would come true.

“I’m an independent on the Republican ticket so I can vote for Nikki Haley,” Carroll said. “Because Donald Trump, I don’t want him in office.” (Under New Hampshire law, independent voters can cast ballots for Democratic and Republican candidates.)

There appears to be less movement on the Democratic side. But President Joe Biden’s allies are waging a write-in campaign for him in the state’s undeclared primary, which he declined to participate in because of a larger battle over scheduling between the state and national Democrats.

But many Democrats still hope Biden can easily win through a write-in campaign to stave off an embarrassing defeat to Rep. Dean Phillips or writer Marianne Williamson, who are challenging him for the nomination.

“[People have been confused] And upset. A lot of people resent that. But there’s nothing Biden can really control…or New Hampshire. These are the rules, and we have to follow them whether we like it or not. New Hampshire should be first, and the Democratic National Committee says South Carolina should be first. “So, we hit a dead end,” said Donna Vanderbeek, a supporter of the write-in campaign.

However, others felt less positively about Biden.

Photo: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to reporters as he visits a polling site at Londonderry High School on January 23, 2024 in Londonderry, New Hampshire.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to reporters as he visits a polling site at Londonderry High School on January 23, 2024 in Londonderry, New Hampshire.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Phillips looks to run to Biden’s left and bow to the 26-year age difference between the two (Phillips is 55 and Biden is 81) while arguing that Biden cannot face Trump in a rematch in November.

Progressives are frustrated with Biden’s handling of Israel’s war in Gaza against Hamas after the Hamas terror attack in October, with some prompting voters to write “ceasefire” instead of the president’s name.

“He was one of the candidates I saw the most, and it affects a lot who you vote for,” Daniel Rosario said of why he voted for Phillips. “But I also agree with a lot of his opinions, along with the fact that he’s younger — something we haven’t seen in a while.”

Rosario later clarified that he had not gone to any of Phillips’ events in New Hampshire, but had seen ads for Phillips and some YouTube videos about the candidates.

Why don’t you vote for Williamson? “She didn’t catch my attention enough,” Rosario said, adding that although she had “a lot of opinions that I agree with, there was something about her that didn’t invite me to vote for her.” As for President Joe Biden, Rosario said he feels Biden has been in office or running for a long time.

George Shaker said: “I don’t know that any of the candidates was strong enough regarding what is happening in Gaza.” He added: “President Biden certainly was not, and I think we need a voice with greater humanitarian concern. More than 25,000 people have already been killed in Gaza; civilians, children, women and men.”

ABC News’ Galen Druck, Matthew Foreman and Nicholas Kerr contributed to this report.

This article originally appeared on abcnews.go.com

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