Deaths at Boise Airport lead people to ask: What is the Jackson Jet Center? What do you do, or what do you do?

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Most Treasure Valley residents know about Jacksons Food Stores, a chain of convenience stores where you can buy a candy bar or a six-pack after filling up your car. As of Wednesday night, far fewer people knew about it Jackson Gate Centerowned by the same local family.

A metal building frame being constructed next to the center He collapsed Authorities said three people were killed on Wednesday and nine others were injured, five of them in serious condition. Suddenly, eyes all over the valley turned to covering the horrific news Boise Airport. Suddenly, the Jackson Gate Center was the center of attention.

The family’s owners were silent Wednesday and Thursday, declining to answer questions and issuing only a brief press release expressing sadness over the tragedy and gratitude to emergency responders.

Here are answers to four key questions about the company.

1. What is Jackson Gate Center?

This is what is known in aviation as a fixed base operator, or FBO. Fixed base operators are companies licensed by the airport to provide services to small aircraft or mostly privately owned aircraft – a sector known as general aviation. General aviation represents 4,338 trips In December, the airport reported a 38% increase over December 2022, despite operations year-to-date up only 1%.

Boise Airport has Two more fixed operators Rivalry with Jackson: Western aircraft And Turbo Air.

The number of employees at the Jackson Gate Center was not immediately known. It had 65 employees in 2015, according to a press release at the time.

The center’s address is 3815 Rickenbacker Street. The center is easily visible to passersby on Interstate 84 just north of the airport.

The building under construction that collapsed was to be a new hangar at the Jackson Jet Center at Boise Airport, adjacent to Interstate 84. The current aircraft center buildings are the four connected buildings on the left.  The proposed location for the new barn is marked by dotted lines to the right of those four lines in this aerial view looking to the southwest.  The square building in the upper right houses Firehawk helicopters.

2. What exactly does the Jackson Gate Center do?

Most of its business is divided into two segments: aircraft services and charter flights.

Aircraft services: This 2015 press release described Jackson Jet Center as having a “state-of-the-art private terminal and hangar at Boise Airport” that offers “private jet and turboprop charters, professional aircraft management, full concierge services, and 110,000 square feet of space.” ft. of storage hangar, FAA repair station maintenance, and aircraft sales. The release boasted: “JJC is the Northwest’s first and only FBO certified by the prestigious global Air Elite network.”

The center has a private passenger terminal with a 9,400-square-foot lobby. In 2015, the Sun Valley Air Club called the center a “world-class facility.”

Charter flights: Do you want to travel, for example, to Sun Valley? You can choose from six planes. You can rent a five- or seven-seat Citation CE 525B light aircraft for $2,750 per hour; Four-seat Mustang CE-510 “Very light” aircraft. At $2,050 per hour; Or the slower, nine-seat Pilatus PC-12-47 turboprop for $1,431 per hour, according to Aircharter Guide.

Jackson also owns a turboprop in Coeur d’Alene ($1,515 per hour).

3. Who owns the Jackson Gate Center?

The center is part of the Meridian-based Jackson family’s business empire that includes the Jet Center, Jackson food stores, Jackson Energy (formerly Jackson Oil Company) and Capitol Distribution. Jackson Energy transports gasoline to filling stations. Capitol Distributing delivers wholesale groceries to retailers.

john d. Jackson He is a corporate patriarch. His wife, Bonnie, and children, Corey and Jeff, played major roles in the business. Jeff Jackson is president of the Jackson Gate Center.

Jackson Gate Center is what the assumed brand name is called. The actual name of the company is Conyan Aviation Inc., a company founded in 1981 by a small group of Boise business luminaries, including Micron Technology Inc. co-founder Joe Parkinson. It was later acquired by John Jackson.

Owner John Jackson at Jacksons Food Stores Meridian headquarters in 2016.

Owner John Jackson at Jacksons Food Stores Meridian headquarters in 2016.

4. What is the building whose structure collapsed?

Additional hangar for aircraft. The center actually includes four buildings connected to each other like train cars. This building could have been an independent barn.

“These hangars are essential to JacksonJet’s continued operations after Boise Airport requires JacksonJet to vacate its existing hangars in order to accommodate parking facilities planned for the airport,” according to an application submitted to the city by architectural firm Boise Glancy, Rockwell & Associates, which prepared design drawings for the hangar. .

The 45-foot-tall barn was expected to cost about $6.2 million, according to a report submitted to the city. Plans called for vertical metal siding and a blue stripe along the top of the building.

The under-construction building that collapsed Wednesday was scheduled to be made of engineered metal, a type of standard equipment that is assembled on-site atop a concrete foundation.  This is a proposal submitted to the City of Boise as part of a building permit application.

The under-construction building that collapsed Wednesday was scheduled to be made of engineered metal, a type of standard equipment that is assembled on-site atop a concrete foundation. This is a proposal submitted to the City of Boise as part of a building permit application.

Debris shows the twisted beams of the steel frame of the unfinished hangar that collapsed Wednesday next to the Boise Airport.

Debris shows the twisted beams of the steel frame of the unfinished hangar that collapsed Wednesday next to the Boise Airport.

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