Total eclipse in these parts: How and where to watch the April 8 solar phenomenon

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For the second time in less than seven years, a total solar eclipse will be visible over a wide area of ​​Illinois.

The path of the April 8 eclipse will once again include the city of Carbondale, which is preparing for a big viewing party in Southern Illinois University Greyhound Stadium.

a Solar eclipse This happens when the moon passes in front of the sun, turning day into night momentarily for those in the path of its shadow.

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Springfield will have 96-97% coverage, according to John Martin, associate professor of astronomy/physics at UCLA. University of Illinois Springfield.

the Springfield Convention and Visitors Bureau It markets the city as an “eclipse oasis” that welcomes visitors to or from eclipse destination sites. The Crowne Plaza Hotel Springfield offers guests access to its rooftop to view the partial eclipse.

Here are some things to know about the event:

Twice is beautiful

Carbondale is located on the middle line of the path of totality, and will have four minutes and nine seconds of totality, or nearly double what was seen in 2017, according to www.eclipse.siu.edua web page dedicated to eclipses.

The university town hosts a four-day festival (April 5-8) featuring workshops, concerts, a craft fair, and a Run from the Sun 5K race.

more: Part of the clouds to give southern Illinois a glimpse of a total solar eclipse

SIU officials estimated that 14,000 tickets were sold for all-day events at the stadium in 2017.

Other cities in the path of totality in the Midwest include Cape Girardeau, Missouri; Indianapolis and Dayton.

In Springfield

The sun will be partially covered in Springfield.

according to www.timeanddate.comMaximum viewing time will be 2:02 pm. The first contact, the moment the edge of the Moon touches the edge of the Sun, occurs at 12:45 noon, and the duration is two hours and 33 minutes.

“(In Springfield), you are in a part of the shade called the penumbra, which means that part of the sun will remain exposed,” Martin said. “It won’t get dark (like a total eclipse).”

There will be screenings at the University of Illinois Springfield, Brookins Library and Pleasant Plains Public Library.

SpringHill Suites Springfield Serves an eclipse-themed dinner for two with craft beer and dessert. Other hotels in Springfield Offers special rates for eclipse travelers.

Don’t forget your glasses

Martin warned that staring or looking directly at the sun can harm your eyes, and this applies to telescope users as well.

Eclipse glasses must meet some requirements ISO approved standardsAs long as the mylar doesn’t tear or scratch, he added, the glasses should last.

If you don’t have eclipse glasses, viewers can create a pinhole camera with directions to find Youtube. A sun funnel is a telescope device that allows users to safely observe an enlarged image of the sun.

“Powerful experience”

Martin said he became a “devout evangelist” for trying to get viewers to travel to college tracks.

It was just north Prairie Island, Neb.for eclipse 2017.

University of Illinois Springfield Associate Professor of Astronomy and Physics John Martin, right, talks about the solar telescope used by Military and Veteran Student Services Director Loren Easter while observing the sun on the roof of Brookins Library at UIS Thursday.  August 31, 2023.

University of Illinois Springfield Associate Professor of Astronomy and Physics John Martin, right, talks about the solar telescope used by Military and Veteran Student Services Director Loren Easter while observing the sun on the roof of Brookins Library at UIS Thursday. August 31, 2023.

“I’m an astronomer. I teach people about eclipses,” he said. “I can academically tell you what happens during a total solar eclipse, but the experience still surprises me.

“It was a very powerful experience compared to just hearing it, and I think people should take the opportunity to see it if they can.”

Learn more

Below are the events where Martin will speak:

  • Eclipse Children’s, Chatham Public Library, 600 E. Spruce Street, 2 to 3 p.m., March 13

  • Eclipse General Public Library, Chatham Public Library, 600 E. Spruce Street, 6 to 7 p.m., March 28

  • Talk, Lincoln Memorial Park, 2301 E. Lakeshore Dr., 7 p.m., April 4

  • Solar Telescope, Henson Robinson Zoo, 1100 E. Lakeshore Dr., 11 a.m.-2 p.m., April 6-7

Below is a list of events at which Charles Schweighauser, Professor Emeritus of English, Astronomy and Physics at the UIS will be speaking:

  • Eclipse Talk, Pleasant Plains Public Library, 555 Buckeye Road, time TBD, April 6

  • Partial eclipse viewing, Pleasant Plains Public Library, 555 Buckeye Road, 1-3 p.m., April 8

Other events

  • Partial eclipse viewing, University of Illinois Springfield, Brookins Library, 1 to 3 p.m., April 8

Call Stephen Sperry: 217-622-1788; sspearie@sj-r.com; X, twitter.com/@StevenSpearie.

This article originally appeared in the State Journal-Register: How and where you can experience the solar eclipse in Springfield on April 8

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